Luang Prabang

Our first night in Luang Prabang was a chilled dinner where we had the best lava cake ever and a walk round the night market which was luckily on the same street as our first guesthouse.

The following day we woke up early for our trip to the “rice experience” this was where we went to learn how rice is farmed from the ploughing of the fields right through to eating it. Our guide explained that there was 14 steps to making rice. The organisation who run the farm are called Living Land Lao. It’s a working farm, but through the tours it supports children from poor families to go to high school and university if they wish, for free. They also run English classes that the local children go to for free. Our guide Den, had just finished high school with them. He spoke with fluent English from the classes and was teaching them and working the tours when he could to pay them back for their generosity.

The tour started with showing us which of the rice from the plants is planted for food. There are no waste parts to the process, the seeds not planted are fed to chickens. After we were shown how the seeds were germinated and then using Rudolph the water buffalo we ploughed the fields. During the experience we planted the rice, harvested it, helped to sort the seeds out, prepared it using a large pestle and mortar and most importantly we ate it. The dry season is not the prime season for rice as you get very little grains from the plants and due to he fact no other farmers will be farming at this time the birds and mice will get most of the products as they flock to the one farm.

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After the rice experience we took a bus to Kuang Si Waterfall. The way the path works is you walk through the bear sanctuary at the base and walk upwards through the pools of the falls until you reach the main falls. At the first pool we jumped in the water. In the western world I feel like the pools would have been overly busy but here everyone stood round the edges not going in. The water was pretty cold but the temperatures are mid to late 30’s so cold water was welcome. Haven’t got much more to say on the waterfall so here’s some pictures.

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ue to the bus being full we had to spend a further 4 nights here, after changing Hotel we spent the next four days exploring the city and buying plenty in the night market.

After Luang Prabang we headed to the party town of Vang Vieng.

10 things I’ve learned about India after my first visit

1. Indian drivers have amazing spatial awareness (and they need it). Indian roads are mental, if there is a space that your vehicle will fit in then it will. Regardless of it being a lane or not.

2. India really is an assault on your senses and it’s amazing. There is always noise whether it be dogs barking, horns constantly sounding, people singing or prayer music. Bright colours are all over especially in arid areas like Rajasthan where the ground is very beige. Flowers called rangoli’s which are bright are brought to temples, the buildings are painted colours and the women wear the brightest clothes I have ever seen.

There is always a smell in the air whether it be incense, burning rubbish or cow dung. The food is spicy, they tone it down for foreigners but it still burns my tongue off! Even the cups of tea here include spices (chai masala tea).

3. Indians have incredibly bendy legs. Not sure whether this is because of the amazing muscles they need just to use the bathroom or it’s down to something else but they can really bend those legs! So many men squat on small fence posts comfortably as their seats.

4. Curries do get better than your favourite Indian restaurant at home. My curry tastes have definitely been changed. I’ve gone from just eating chicken curries to preferring vegetable curries with paneer or dal (paneer where have you been all my life). I’ve jumped off the naan bandwagon and on to the roti rodeo.

5. In the past when I’ve visited monuments that I’ve been excited about (the statue of liberty comes to mind) they’ve disappointed me. I’ve learned that, that doesn’t always have to be the case. The Taj Mahal took my breath away and I almost cried it was so stunning. It was so much more than the hype.

6. Indians stare. a lot. I’m not sure if this shocked me more because coming from Britain we are taught at an early age that staring is rude. Everywhere we have gone the locals will stop and stare at us. They don’t even stop staring when you stare back, this encourages them even more! It’s expected now but this is definitely one of the things I’ve felt most uncomfortable about.

7. Animals live harmoniously amongst people. In every place we have been there have been cows wandering aimlessly, on the highways and in the towns. This is because of their sacredness to the Hindus of India. In the cities their are thousands of stray dogs and wild monkeys roaming without anyone thinking anything of it.

8. I didn’t realise how much of a religious country India would be. I knew there was Hindus and Muslims but there are so much more. There’s thousands of temples to thousands of God’s and goddesses.

9. Each city we visited varied so much, Delhi is so crazy busy and dusty. Agra is so touristy and people clamber for your business and Jaipur, although busy has a laid back atmosphere which I liked the best.

10. Finally, how much I love India. It has been so much more than I could have imagined or hoped for and I will definitely be back.